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Philosophy Department Faculty


Richard Buck

Richard Buck

Department Chair and Associate Professor
B.A., Loyola University of Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas

Dr. Buck began teaching at Mount St. Mary's in 2001. His research and teaching interests lie primary in political philosophy, ethical theory, philosophy of law, and contemporary Jewish philosophy (focusing on the work of Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik). He has presented and published essays on the idea of public reason and the role of religious argument in public debate, equality and deliberate democracy, democratic legitimacy, just responses to terrorism, and religious liberty in Catholic social thought. He regularly teaches courses in the core curriculum, and frequently offers electives in political philosophy and philosophy of law.

Christopher Anadale

Christopher Anadale

Assistant Professor
B.A., Salisbury University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University

Dr. Anadale joined the department in 2009, from a background in seminary teaching. He designs and teaches some philosophy courses for pre-theology seminarians at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, as well as teaching in the undergraduate philosophy core. His areas of interest include modern philosophy, faith and reason, and epistemology. His current research interests include contemporary debates about faith and reason, the role of philosophy in seminary formation, and nineteenth century Catholic liberalism. Dr. Anadale is also director of the master of arts in philosophical studies program.

Bill Collinge

William J. Collinge

Professor Emeritus of Theology and Philosophy
B.A., Georgetown University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University

Dr. Collinge primarily teaches theology courses, although in the past he has taught a broad range of philosophy courses. Two courses that he teaches regularly that are cross-listed with philosophy are St. Augustine and mysticism east and west. He is currently finishing a third edition of his Historical Dictionary of Catholicism. His research interests are the thought of St. Augustine; Dorothy Day and the Catholic worker movement; the theology of John S. Dunne; and Catholic social thought. Dr. Collinge is also the chair of the Adams County Heritage Festival, an annual multicultural festival of the arts.

Trudy Conway

Gertrude Conway

University Professor Emerita of Philosophy
B.A., College of New Rochelle; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University

Trudy Conway began teaching at Mount St. Mary's in 1979. Prior to that she taught at Shiraz University in Iran. She works in the area of contemporary philosophy and has published a book and articles on the works of Wittgenstein and Gadamer. She has published on the topic of intercultural understanding and dialogue and the hermeneutical issues and virtues associated with them. She has also written on, and is actively involved in the issue of the death penalty. She regularly teaches courses in the core curriculum and a non-west course focusing on intercultural dialogue. She has offered a wide range of electives on topics in contemporary philosophy, specific moral virtues, and perspectives on the death penalty.

John Hersey

John Hersey

Assistant Professor
B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., The Catholic University of America

Dr. Hersey's areas of interest include ancient philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and contemporary hermeneutics. His research focuses on ancient philosophy and the phenomenological tradition, especially as developed by Martin Heidegger. He is currently editing a book on Heidegger and Plato on Truth. Other research includes consideration of the themes of being, understanding, and freedom, as well as interdisciplinary topics engaging the relation between philosophy and literature. Dr. Hersey enjoys writing, traveling, lifting weights, running, and regularly plays sports, especially hockey. He is currently co-organizer of an adult hockey league in Frederick.

Josh Hochschild

Joshua Hochschild

Professor
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame

Dr. Hochschild came to Mount St. Mary’s in 2005, after four years teaching at Wheaton College (IL). In addition to courses in the core curriculum, he has taught ancient and medieval philosophy, ethics, and metaphysics, as well as independent studies on Plato, Aquinas, Dante, and John Henry Newman. His research specialty is medieval logic and metaphysics, and more generally the continuing relevance of Aristotle and the Catholic intellectual tradition in the history of ideas. He edited two volumes on ethics (Virtues End and Ethics Without God, both 2008), authored a book, The Semantics of Analogy: Rereading Cajetan’s De Nominum Analogia (2010), and has published numerous articles and review essays in scholarly and popular publications. He has been proud to champion liberal education, in writings, lectures and faculty seminars; from 2009 to 2015 he served as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, and for three of those years also as Director of the Veritas Symposium. For 2016-2019 he holds the Monsignor Robert R. Kline Chair of Philosophy.

Jessy Jordan

Jessy Jordan

Associate Professor
B.A., Grand Canyon University; M. Div., Truett Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Baylor University

Dr. Jordan earned his doctoral degree in philosophy from Baylor University in 2008, completing a dissertation entitled Iris Murdoch's Genealogy of the Modern Self. His areas of specialization are metaethics, virtue ethics, and natural normativity. Dr. Jordan also has a longstanding interest in the reasonability of the Christian faith, especially as it relates to testimonial knowledge. In addition to teaching courses in the Mount's core curriculum, he has taught a wide-range of electives, including Contemporary Catholic Philosophy, Metaethics, and Aristotle After Kant. His scholarly work is currently focused on defending Neo-Aristotelian natural normativity from its detractors.

Justin Matchulat

Justin Matchulat

Assistant Professor
B.A., Auburn University; M.A., The Catholic University of America; Ph.D., Purdue University

Dr. Matchulat received his doctorate from Purdue University in 2014, completing a dissertation entitled Practical Cognition and Moral Motivation in the Thought of Thomas Aquinas. His areas of interest include Ethics, Medieval Philosophy (especially St. Thomas Aquinas), and Ancient Philosophy. His publications are on virtue ethics and the grounds of human dignity, and his current research is on the relationship between desire and cognition in St. Thomas Aquinas's moral theory. He loves the Mount's beautiful campus, the strong sense of community among the faculty, and the Mount's rich liberal arts core program which complements it's Catholic identity. He teaches courses in Ethics and the History of Philosophy. He loves bringing to life the thought of great philosophers for students, and helping them think earnestly about the good life.

Mike Miller

Michael Miller

Associate Professor
B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Boston College

Dr. Miller earned his doctoral degree in 2000 from Boston College, where he completed a dissertation In Defense of the Reconciliation of Divine Will and Human Freedom According to St. Thomas Aquinas. His research continues to focus upon questions that investigate the nature of God, metaphysics, and human nature. In addition to his published articles he edited Doing More with Life, a collection of essays from the perspective of various disciplines about the meaning of vocation. Dr. Miller very much enjoys teaching the department's courses in the core curriculum, as well as various electives, including Medieval philosophy, metaphysics, and Islamic philosophy, a now-west course in the curriculum. Dr. Miller currently holds the Monsignor Robert R. Kline Chair of Philosophy. He joined the department in 2002.

Thane Naberhaus

Thane Naberhaus

Associate Professor
B.A., Rice University; M.A., University of Memphis; Ph.D., Georgetown University

Dr. Naberhaus's areas of interest are phenomenology, 19th and 20th c. German philosophy, modern philosophy, and contemporary philosophy. His research focuses on the phenomenological tradition, especially in its classical form as developed by Edmund Husserl. More broadly, he is interested in the tradition of transcendental philosophy as an alternative to empiricism, pragmatism, and other philosophical approaches that see the methods of inquiry in the natural sciences as models for philosophical truth-seeking. This interest leads to a particular focus on questions of philosophical method, and on what is distinctive about the philosophical mode of inquiry. Currently, Dr. Naberhaus is working on a translation of Husserl's First Philosophy, which deals with just these questions in a sustained way.

David Rehm

David Rehm

University Professor
B.A., Oberlin College; University of Chicago, Ph.D.

Dr. Rehm came to Mount St. Mary’s in 1995. Through 2003, Dr. Rehm regularly taught philosophy courses in the Mount’s core curriculum along with ancient philosophy, metaphysics, and ethics. From 1997-2003, Dr. Rehm served as director of the Mount’s Freshman Seminar program and taught in the program. In 2004, Dr. Rehm was appointed Dean of Undergraduate Studies, and in 2006, he was appointed Provost, a position which he held through early 2016. Dr. Rehm has presented papers and written articles on Plotinus, ancient philosophy, Catholic higher education, and the value of the liberal arts. Dr. Rehm serves as a Commissioner for the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

 
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